*Seeking communities, cities and climate change case studies*

The policy report *“What about the people? The socially sustainable,
resilient community and urban development”* (by Cathy Baldwin, University
of Oxford, and Robin King, World Resources, Institute)
be.brookes.ac.uk/research/iag/resources/what-about-the-people.pdf
http://thecityfix.com/blog/what-about-the-people-unlocking-the-key-to-socially-sustainable-and-resilient-communities-cathy-baldwin-robin-king/
looks at how the physical environment of cities strengthens communities
through influencing their thoughts, feelings and behaviours to take
positive actions that help them respond resiliently to the adverse effects
of climate change-related adverse weather events and natural disasters.


It is under review with Routledge Publishers for publication as a book in
printed and eformats, with global distribution in universities, think
tanks, multilateral organisations, NGOs etc under their Environment and
Sustainability strand for academic and policy audiences.


The publisher has asked if we could like to expand our content to include
further case studies and evidence-based recommendations from around the
world (particularly the global south, e.g. Africa, Latin America and Asia)
of policies, practical projects or research about initiatives /projects
that demonstrate any of the following:


a)      Urban form or community participation in urban initiatives that
supports the behavioural, social, cultural, psychological or physical
health aspects of resilience to the adverse environmental effects of
climate change, e.g. adverse weather events, periods of extreme
temperatures, natural disasters etc.



b)    Communities adversely affected by climate change – where somehow
(incidentally / accidentally) the physical or biophysical/ natural
environments (e.g. green spaces) of the city positively support
communities’ social/health resilience



If you / your organisation / your colleagues have any written material that
would make for informative case studies that explicitly includes
qualitative (descriptive / ethnographic) or quantitative data on how the
built environment and community participation in development has supported
behavioural, psychological, cultural, social or health aspects of
resilience, that are readily available as secondary sources, and that we
could analyse, please let us know asap.


These could be project reports, evaluations, journal papers, online
articles etc.


We're not looking for author contributions but secondary material that we
can analyse.


Thank you very much indeed.

Best wishes,

Cathy


Dr Cathy Baldwin, cathy.baldwin@anthro.ox.ac.uk
Research Associate, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology,
University of Oxford
https://anthro.web.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-cathy-baldwin
Visiting Research Academic, Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment,
Oxford Brookes University

CALL FOR PAPERS | Asian Extremes: Climate, Meteorology and Disaster in History

Date:17 May 2018 - 18 May 2018

Venue:Asia Research Institute, Seminar Room
AS8, Level 4, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260

SUBMISSION DEADLINE | 17 OCTOBER 2017

The weather plays an often underestimated, yet vitally important role in human history. Climate has been considered an explanation for almost every aspect of society and culture, from causing disease to determining racial characteristics historically. Extremes of weather, especially those experienced in Asia including typhoons and monsoon rains, have also had a major impact on society. In urban areas, the weather has contributed to urban destruction and shaped resultant urban rebuilding and planning. In the port and coastal cities of Asia, the need to understand those extremes also led to pioneering scientific developments in the fields of meteorology and maritime science. In the modern Anthropocene, the need to understand the history of the climate and all its associated impacts is ever more critical.

Climate and weather history are still considered emerging fields despite some precedent from the sciences and arguably, studies in this field have disproportionately favoured Northern Europe, in large part because of the greater availability and accessibility of records for this region. There are still many knowledge gaps for Asia however, partly because of the paucity of records in comparison to Europe, because many archives have either been restricted or have only relatively recently been opened, but also because regional scholars have overly focused on teleological nationalistic explorations of the past.

The aim of this conference therefore is to explore the role of the weather in the history of anthropogenic Asia. It ties in with current historiographical trends that explore scientific history as a globally linked enterprise, one that crossed different national and imperial borders. It also sees Asia as critical to the development of global meteorological science: understanding extremes such as typhoons were essential to trade, economy and society. Despite the centrality of extreme weather to urban Asia historically (and in the present day) however, this field remains relatively under researched. The panels adopt an interdisciplinary approach, appealing to historians, social scientists and natural scientists with an interest in events and trends in the history of climate changes and extremes of weather, to suggest what an enhanced understanding of the past might teach us about managing and adapting to current climatic challenges. This helps us to fill a gap between different disciplines, especially meteorologists and scientist who are more concerned with quantified data and historian and/or social scientists who put more emphasis on socio-political aspects of climate and climate change.

In this conference, we seek to gain a better understanding of the following themes:    

  • Asian Extremes: Weather as a Driver of Change
  • Imperial Meteorology: A Global Science
  • Culture, Climate and Weather
  • Weather History and the Modern-Day: Integrating History and Science in the Anthropocene       


SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

Submissions should include a title, an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief biography including name, institutional affiliation, and email contact. Please note that only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. The organizers plan to publish a special issue with selected papers presented in this conference. By participating in the conference you agree to participate in the future publication plans (special issue/journal) of the organizers. The organizers will provide hotel accommodation for three nights and a contribution towards airfare for accepted paper participants (one author per paper).

Please submit your proposal, using the provided proposal template to Dr Fiona Williamson at ariwfc@nus.edu.sg and Sharon at arios@nus.edu.sg by 17 October 2017. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 17 November 2017.

CONTACT DETAILS

Conference Convenors

Dr Fiona Williamson
Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
E | ariwfc@nus.edu.sg

Assoc Prof Gregory Clancey
Asia Research Institute, and Tembusu College, National University of Singapore

CFP: Design & Environment. An Intensive, Interdisciplinary, and Output-Oriented Workshop

Wednesday 28 February and Thursday 1 March 2018, University of Leeds.

 

Abstract deadline: 13 October 2017

3 to 5 page essay deadline: 12 January 2018

 

KEYNOTES

Wendy Gunn (Senior Research Fellow at the Research[x]Design Research Group, Department of Architecture, KU Leuven)

And

Clare Rishbeth (Lecturer in Landscape Architecture at the Department of Landscape, The University of Sheffield)

THEME

This two-day workshop seeks to critically rethink how design and environment inform each other. Architects, designers, and environmental scholars from a range of disciplines are committed to sustainability. However, the relationships between these fields of inquiry and production are not self-evident. How are design and environment intertwined, or when does environment become design and vice versa?

 

It has long been recognised that spatial planning and design are not just matters of aesthetics or convenience, but can have major consequences for how an environment functions in social terms. The examples of destructive socio-spatial segregation are ample, as are those of fragmented ecosystems. The workshop invites reflections on the troubled relationship between design and environment beyond conventional “Design for the Environment” (DfE) frameworks (focussing on the environmental impact of products or processes) and seeks to defy the idea that design altruistically works ‘for the betterment of all’. Acknowledging instead the normativity and embeddedness of design in power structures, can serve to expose the intentionality of environmental changes. In turn, environmental changes, as well as contemporary understandings of the socio-material configuration of space, can produce surprising understandings of how design processes work and allow for more inclusive, and perhaps empowering conceptualisations of design. The emerging field of design anthropology in particular has been “concerned with how people perceive, create, and transform their environments through their everyday activities” [1], thus developing a broad conceptualisation of design as a way of making the world.

Where do (studies of) design and environment meet, and what kinds of understandings does this offer? What are the pitfalls and challenges this encounter brings forward? How do the temporalities and materialities of design and environment align or clash in working towards a sustainable future?

Anthropologists, geographers, designers, architects, humanities scholars and others, at all career stages, are invited to contribute to this two-day workshop. Possible topics for discussion include, but are not limited to:

 

• Temporalities in/of environment and design

• Environmental crisis and disaster

• Design, destruction, and (spatial) inequality

• Urban and rural landscape architectures

• Controlled environments

• Aesthetics, representation and critique

• (Post)colonial environments

• Utopia and social engineering

• Sustainable design and environmental management

• Dwelling and everyday design

 

FORMAT

This will be an intensive, interdisciplinary and output-oriented workshop. Apart from public keynote lectures by Wendy Gunn (KU Leuven) and Clare Rishbeth (The University of Sheffield), the workshop will be closed to people who are not presenting to improve commitment within the group. The workshop is limited to a maximum of 20 people.

 

Those interested are kindly asked to send an abstract (max 200 words) outlining their ideas to Arvid van Dam (a.vandam@leeds.ac.uk) before 13 October 2017.

 

Invited participants will then be asked to submit a 3 to 5 page essay well before the workshop and all participants are expected to read the essays in their panel. In addition, they will be asked to send 1 to 3 thematic questions with their essay, which might inform the panel discussions. During the meeting, each participant will give a pitch rather than a full presentation, focussing on the main argument of their essay (creative approaches are welcome), and allowing for in-depth discussions. There will be no parallel panels. Various sessions will be directed, each in their own way, at coming up with collaborative output based on the discussions and presentations.

REFERENCE

[1] Gunn, W., T. Otto & R.C. Smith (2013). Design anthropology: Theory and practice. London, New York: Bloomsbury. (Page xiii).

 

––––

Arvid van Dam

Doctoral fellow

Disaster studies | Design Anthropology | Environmental Humanities

 

University of Leeds

Leeds Humanities Research Institute

Room 1.04 | 29-31 Clarendon Place a.vandam@leeds.ac.uk +31 6 15275313 | +44 113 34 32025

CFPs: Remaking the Museum

The Aarhus University Centre for Environmental Humanities is excited to
invite proposals for contributions to an interdisciplinary conference on
"Remaking the Museum: Curation, Conservation, and Care in Times of
Ecological Upheaval." Bringing together leading scholars and practitioners
from across the environmental humanities and beyond, the conference will
take place at Denmark's Moesgaard Museum on December 6th and 7th, 2017.

Please send abstracts (200 words) or enquiries to Michael Vine (
mdv27@cam.ac.uk) by November 1, 2017.

CFPs: Remaking the Museum

In this time of entangled social and environmental crisis, the need to not
only reimagine but remake the museum has acquired new urgency. In response,
this two-day conference will bring together leading scholars and
practitioners to investigate the opportunities, challenges, and limits of
the museum as a catalyst for social change in this geological epoch of our
making: the Anthropocene. From the museum’s early modern origins to the
development of today’s highly heritage saturated public culture, the
capacity of museums and their objects to perform particular relationships
between nature, culture, and history has always been important—inviting
critique from a variety of political and theoretical vantage points. The
emergence of the Anthropocene as both a contested concept and concrete
reality adds new layers of complexity and intensity to this story.



What modes of collecting, classifying, conserving, and curating are called
for amidst this moment of unfolding change? How to actively reshape our
relations with contemporary ecologies of loss, profusion, and
transformation in a way that is both more affirmative and more just? What
alternative practices of curation and care flourish in the margins of
official heritage projects? How can we differently actualize what Tony
Bennett long ago called “the exhibitionary complex” in light of
contemporary issues? And finally: Given the museum’s problematic history,
can it be salvaged as the vector of its own remediation? Working across a
wide range of historical, geographical, and disciplinary contexts, scholars
and practitioners will come together in Denmark’s Moesgaard Museum to
consider these important questions. Our aim for the conference is not only
to critique and deconstruct—important tasks in their own right—but also
chart a path forward for the museum as a powerful force for world-making.



The conference organizers invite proposals for papers that address the
following or any related themes from across the environmental humanities
and beyond:


Hacking the museum: Inspired by the hands-on, experimental approach of the
makers movement, we invite papers that chart past cases or future potential
with regards to the practical transformation of museum spaces and
approaches. In what ways are the institutional, political, and physical
boundaries of the museum being punctured and rearticulated in this time of
social and ecological upheaval?


Ontological frictions: How are are the different ontological commitments
and epistemic demands of art, science, and history museums being recombined
in light of the notion of the Anthropocene? How are the museum’s
traditional divisions between nature, culture, human, nonhuman, life, and
death being muddled—whether intentionally or not—and with what consequences?


Curating change: What alternative and experimental curatorial practices are
taking shape in response to the entangled social and environmental crises
of the present? How do these move through and beyond the museum? And how
are contemporary museum imaginaries making space for today’s temporalities
of loss, profusion, and transformation within their approaches?


Contestations: In what ways do museums materialize questions of
environmental in/justice and drive forward projects of social change? How
does the emergence of the notion of the Anthropocene reflect, refract, or
otherwise rechannel these questions and projects?


Please send abstracts (200 words) or enquiries to Michael Vine (
mdv27@cam.ac.uk) by November 1, 2017.


Best wishes,

Michael Vine


PhD Candidate

Social Anthropology

University of Cambridge


Researcher in Residence

Center for Environmental Humanities

Aarhus University

Engraved in the rock and dissolved into air: the phenomenology of living in a human-induced climate

We are calling for papers for our panel Engraved in the rock and dissolved into air: the phenomenology of living in a human-induced climate, which forms part of the forthcoming AAS/ASA/ASAANZ Shifting States Anthropology conference in Adelaide, Australia, 11-15 December 2017. The panel will explore thevalue of incorporating a phenomenological analysis into the study of climate change. Papers that examine—conceptually or empirically—the lived experience of climate change are sought.

Further information can be found here: http://nomadit.co.uk/shiftingstates/conferencesuite.php/panels/5977


Dr Hedda Haugen Askland
Senior Lecturer in Anthropology
Research Lead, Centre for Social Research and Regional Futures
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

T: +61 2 4921 7067
M: +61 405 066 470
F: +61 2 4921 6933
E: Hedda.Askland@newcastle.edu.au<mailto:Hedda.Askland@newcastle.edu.au>
W: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/hedda-askland
T: @AsklandHedda

Climate Politics in Interesting Times

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS


The PSA Specialist Group Environmental Politics is pleased to invite you to: 

Climate Politics in Interesting Times

 
Friday 15th September 2017, 10:00-17:00 

The Sustainability Hub, Keele University


The politics around governing global climate change are complex enough at the best of times. Now, a surge of populism, ‘fake news’, and the election of Donald Trump as US President, all in times of ongoing austerity in Western democracies, add even greater challenges to the picture. In this research workshop, we will explore what these ‘interesting times’ mean for the prospects, barriers, and new opportunities of climate governance. The event brings together academics, researchers, activists and policy-makers with expertise in climate politics, to explore any or all of the following questions:

  • How has the transnational climate governance arena evolved since Paris 2015?
  • What new barriers have arisen as a result of austerity, populism, Brexit and Trump?
  • How might they be addressed?
  • What are the prospects for international climate politics without US involvement in the Paris Agreement?
  • Does the changed context create any new opportunities as well?
  • What are the (new?) roles of scientists / experts / activists / citizens in today’s climate politics?

Contributions are invited that deal with these or related questions in relation to climate politics at all levels – local, regional, national, trans- and international –, focussing on different types of actors and specific issue areas, and from all relevant disciplines, whether empirical or theoretical.

We particularly invite contributions and participation of postgraduate students and early career researchers. Some funding is available to help support travel expenses for postgraduates and early career researchers on fixed-term contracts; please just include a note outlining why you would need to draw on this with your abstract submission.

The workshop will comprise:

  • Two academic research panels on different specific themes;
  • A roundtable that brings together these scholarly perspectives with the perspectives of practitioners, activists and policy-makers;
  • A career advice session for postgraduate students and early career researchers; and
  • A grant writing clinic specifically geared towards environmental research.

Those interested in presenting a panel paper should submit an abstract of 300 words max.; those interested in taking part in the practitioner roundtable should submit a brief outline of their role and the position/themes they would wish to speak about, also of 300 words max.

Please submit your abstracts or outlines to Marit Hammond (m.hammond@keele.ac.uk) by Monday 10 July 2017.

Whether you are submitting a paper or roundtable outline, or would just like to attend as a participant without presenting, please register via the Eventbrite page:https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/climate-politics-in-interesting-times-tickets-35035254389

Modern Climate Change and the Practice of Archaeology Conference

NOTE: the call for papers is closed for this conference, but they are open for registration.

Friday‑Saturday, 7‑8 April 2017
Jesus College, University of Cambridge

Modern climate change has serious consequences for the knowledge of our past. Desertification, eroding coasts, rising sea levels and melting permafrost threaten the preservation of natural and cultural sites. These and other damaging processes not only jeopardise the archaeological record, but also the living cultural practices of affected communities and their economic and social resilience. As the planet faces increasing global temperatures, the perils posed by rapid climate change will continue to be a major challenge for archaeology throughout the twenty-first century. This conference will explore the modern climate change related challenges to the practices of archaeology and heritage management, as well as productively contribute to current climate change debates.

Robert Van de Noort, author of Climate Change Archaeology, to give keynote address, "The Resilience of Past Communities in their Responses to Climate Change", at 5pm on Friday, 7 April, to be followed by a drink reception.

To register for the conference visit http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/archaeology

For more information about the conference, please visit:
http://www.societies.cam.ac.uk/arc/conference.html

Sponsored by the Royal Anthropological Institute

Matter and Organisation stream in Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty Conference

Matter and Organisation

Stream Organisers: Hannah Knox and Penny Harvey

12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium
Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty
The University of Manchester
29th August - 1st September 2017
Keynotes: Bill Maurer, Bruno Latour, Emma Crewe, Hugh Willmott

This stream poses the question of what role materials of different kinds play in contemporary organization. The organization of matter is central to the work of business and management. From the extraction of oil, coal and gas in the energy industries, to the use of minerals in mobile phone and computer chip development, from the pressure to reduce the levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the face of climate change, to a move towards thinking in terms of resource efficiency and ethically sourced products, organizations must grapple with the appearance, force, value and power of materials and their properties.

This panel invites papers that take as an ethnographic focus the role that materials play in processes of organisation. We are interested in exploring how materials such as concrete, carbon, nuclear waste, water, sand, fabric, gold, energy, data or metal come to matter within the context of contemporary business and management? What is being done to materials within the context of contemporary organization and what are materials in turn doing to economic and political relations? How does the status of materials change as resources come into confrontation with health and safety, risk, conservation, and the repurposing of materials to new ends? What happens to organisation when materials are combined, made multiple, compound or hybrid? What are the technical, social and imaginative means by which materials come to participate in social worlds? How are materials known, interrogated, and responded to? And what are the challenges now being posed by new materials such as nanotechnologies, smart fabrics, or sensory matter?

By viewing organization through an attention to materials, this panel will ground the issue of uncertainty that this symposium aims to address in a materialist paradigm. It will offer a means of interrogating futurity, risk, anticipation and visions of the future via the affordances, tendencies and resistance of matter as it moves in and out of meaning and in and out of place.

Please submit a 250 word abstract to h.knox@ucl.ac.uk<mailto:h.knox@ucl.ac.uk> by February 28th 2017.

Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies conference Chile


*CFP: Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies International Conference*
*November 15-18, 2017 - Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago - Chile*.
http://knowledgeculture.org

Welcome to Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies (KCE2017) the 4th conference in
the Knowledge/Culture
series <http://knowledgeculture.org/?page_id=1838>, a sequence of
international conferences created by the Institute for Culture and Society
<https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/ics/home> (ICS) at Western Sydney
University, Australia.

The KCE2017 conference is taking place in Santiago, Chile and is
hosted by Universidad
Diego Portales <http://socialesehistoria.udp.cl/> in partnership with
Pontificia
Universidad Católica <http://sociologia.uc.cl/>; the C
<http://coes.cl/en/nuestro-centro/our-center/>enter for Social Conflict and
Cohesion Studie <http://coes.cl/en/nuestro-centro/our-center/>s
<http://coes.cl/en/nuestro-centro/our-center/> (COES) and Núcleo Milenio de
Investigación en Energía y Sociedad<http://www.energiaysociedad.cl/>
(NUMIES).

*Invited Speakers:* Arturo Escobar (University of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill); Marisol de la Cadena (University of California, Davies); Erik
Swyngedouw (University of Manchester); Eduardo Gudynas (Latin American
Centre for Social Ecology, Uruguay); Katherine Gibson (Western Sydney
University); Natasha Myers (York University); Cymene Howe (Rice
University); Noortje Marres (University of Warwick); Vinciane Despret
(Université de Liège).


*Important Dates: *
April 21: Deadline for submitting Panel Proposals
May 26: Deadline for submitting Papers and Audiovisual proposals
June 23: Confirmation of Acceptance of Panels, Papers and Audiovisual
proposals
July 28: Early Bird Registrations Close
August 25: Registrations close

October 2017: Full Program announced

*Conference Organising Committee*

Juan Francisco Salazar (Western Sydney University); Tomás Ariztía
(Universidad Diego Portales & NUMIES); Gay Hawkins (Western Sydney
University); Manuel Tironi (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile &
NUMIES); Paul James (Western Sydney University); Maria Luisa Méndez
(Universidad Diego Portales & COES)  Cristián Simonetti (Pontificia
Universidad Católica de Chile) and Anna Pertierra (Western Sydney
University).

All panel, paper, and audiovisual proposals must be made via the online form
<https://goo.gl/forms/cHQRuB8Cax27ITQq2>.

***

*Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies*


Ecology is one of today’s major ideological fields of operation. Ecological
change and catastrophe are proliferating in a world in flux and crisis.
Emerging worlds and new socio-ecological assemblages are creating forms of
interspecies intimacy and environmental emergency that challenge existing
knowledge practices and demand different modes of collaborating and acting.
If life on earth is changing for everybody and everything how can we invent
different habitats, milieus, ways of being together that enable more things
to matter and make a difference? How are novel forms of social cohesion
emerging around socio-environmental conflicts and justice? What
experimental knowledge and political practices do we need to understand
these emergent socio-ecologies and provoke new ones? And how do these
profound earthly challenges intersect with obdurate and unevenly
distributed forms of violence and inequality/exploitation particularly in
the ‘global south’?

As the idea of the ecological has undergone massive renovation across
numerous disciplines from geography to philosophy to science and beyond,
the key aim of this conference is to explore current transformations in
socioecologies and to generate knowledge practices capable of understanding
their formation and complex reverberations. These conceptual shifts have
not only extended the metaphorical impact of the ecological but also its
analytical force. What this new ecological thinking foregrounds is the
value of knowledge and methods capable of challenging the boundaries
between the social and physical, human and non-human, and material and
non-material.

*The focus of the conference is on six **major themes:*
<http://knowledgeculture.org/?page_id=1840>

   - Socio territorial conflicts & ecologies of social cohesion
   - Anthropocene ecologies
   - Energy ecologies and infrastructures in everyday life
   - Ecologies of urbanism
   - Decolonial ecological politics & Post-capitalist ecologies
   - Ecological imaginaries, experimentation & design ecologies

KCE 2017 will host in Santiago engaged academics, practitioners, scholars
and activists from a range of backgrounds and knowledge institutions to
debate the shifting reckonings with nature and other species-being in
historical, contemporary and future scenarios of crisis and creativity;
environmental justice and inequality; infrastructures; community
solidarities; or the ecological politics of local/global
socio-environmental change.


We invite interdisciplinary panels addressing a wide range of themes in the
environmental social sciences and humanities and from a broad range of
disciplines – including geography, sociology, anthropology, STS, cultural
studies, environmental humanities, philosophy, history, creative arts,
media studies, design, politics, and environmental studies. Contributions
from engaged scientists, policy-makers, not-for-profit actors, activists,
maker communities and other forms of p2p practitioners are also encouraged.

Panels can be proposed as Open Panels (only a title and brief description
and a minimum of 1 paper and maximum of two papers) or Curated Panels (with
a title and a maximum of four pre-agreed papers within them). Sessions run
for 90 minutes. Individual papers should not exceed 20 minutes. *Panel and
paper proposals can be submitted in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Please
note than only keynote talks and panels will have simultaneous translation
english-spanish. *We encourage presenters to prepare handouts and slides in
English (if presenting in Spanish or Portuguese) and in Spanish (if
presenting in English or Portuguese) to facilitate linguistic diversity in
the section and to engage with the conference location.

Artists, activists, academics, designers are encouraged to submit films,
photographs, audio works, installations and web-based formats that speak to
the core themes of the conference. Submissions may be in any language but
if not in Spanish or English they must include subtitles.

On submission of the proposal, only the proposing author will receive an
email confirming receipt. The conference organising committee will assess
all proposals anonymously and communicate results by the due date.


More information is available in the conference website
 knowledgeculture.org. <http://knowledgeculture.org/> For any further
information, please contact: kcechile2017@gmail.com
 

Call for contributions

Scholarship on weather and climate change beyond meteorology is currently disunited. Weather Matters is a place for opinions, debate, reviews. Join us, whether it's with a conference or book review, an opinion on where we should be focusing our efforts in understanding what climate change means for humanity, a piece of writing that didn't quite fit in a thesis or article but might still be interesting to colleagues, or some expressive visual or audio material.

Read More

CfP Climate change and intersectionality

Dear All
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Equality and Diversity (fully OA) is seeking submissions on intersectionality and climate change. We particularly welcome explorations of how categories of difference intersection to further understanding of the effects of climate change, and efforts to mitigate such effects. Submissions may explore gender, disability, race, ethnicity, social class, migration, sexuality, poverty, nationality.
We welcome papers in English, German, French, and Thai. We may be able to accept papers in other languages (including American/British/International sign language) - please contact me (Kate k.sang@hw.ac.uk) for further information.
The full call for papers can be seen here
https://ipedjournal.com/2016/09/08/call-for-papers-on-climate-change-and-intersectionality/
IPED seeks to challenge dominant paradigms of research, including drawing on theories outside the Western canon and alternative forms of presenting research.

The deadline for this call is the end of January 2017.
 Please share with your contacts.
With best wishes
Kate Sang